Thursday, July 31, 2014
What I Had Before I Had You is out in paperback 8/12 and I can’t tell who is more excited, me or the kittens! SO CUTE I WANT TO RUB THAT BELLY (while reading, of course).

In What I Had Before I Had You by Sarah Cornwell, a woman must face the truth about her past in this luminous, evocative literary novel of parents and children, guilt and forgiveness, memory and magical thinking, set in the faded, gritty world of the New Jersey Shore.

Olivia was only fifteen the summer she left her hometown of Ocean Vista. Two decades later, on a visit with her children, her nine-year-old son Daniel, recently diagnosed with bipolar disorder, disappears. Olivia’s search for him sparks tender and painful memories of her past—of her fiercely loving and secretive mother, Myla, an erratic and beautiful psychic, and the discovery of heartbreaking secrets that shattered her world.

[source]

What I Had Before I Had You is out in paperback 8/12 and I can’t tell who is more excited, me or the kittens! SO CUTE I WANT TO RUB THAT BELLY (while reading, of course).

In What I Had Before I Had You by Sarah Cornwell, a woman must face the truth about her past in this luminous, evocative literary novel of parents and children, guilt and forgiveness, memory and magical thinking, set in the faded, gritty world of the New Jersey Shore.

Olivia was only fifteen the summer she left her hometown of Ocean Vista. Two decades later, on a visit with her children, her nine-year-old son Daniel, recently diagnosed with bipolar disorder, disappears. Olivia’s search for him sparks tender and painful memories of her past—of her fiercely loving and secretive mother, Myla, an erratic and beautiful psychic, and the discovery of heartbreaking secrets that shattered her world.

[source]

Wednesday, July 9, 2014
bookavore:

When Jenn tells me a book is possibly her “favorite book of all time. seriously. FAVORITE,” I read it, quick. It took me 48 hours from her declaration to acquire and read Books & Islands in Ojibwe Country by Louise Erdrich, and of course Jenn is largely right. I love Erdrich, and this book is fantastic. For fans of Erdrich, it offers an insight that’s not found in her other books (think the personal nature of Shadow Tag, but without the darkness and pain of that book). For those who haven’t read her yet, it’s a fantastic extended essay, and an American memoir of real substance.
What I loved best about it is the overarching question, which Jenn also notes: “Books. Why?” She offers a number of specific answers throughout the book:
"Because our brains hurt."
"I can take home along anywhere in the person of a book, and I do."
"Because they are wealth, sobriety, and hope."
Meandering off to explore the geography and history of Ojibwe Country, her family, the language of Ojibwemowin, the resurgence of traditional belief, her internal life—Erdrich always returns to this idea. Books. Why? This loose focus is meditative, calming, and radical. So much of the subtext of our conversations about books these days contains this same question, but in anger. Why does this person get to write books? Why do people read those books? Why would you like that book? Why does anybody review books? Why don’t more people read? Books. Why?
Erdrich’s book doesn’t answer these questions, deflating them, and for me, exposing the fear underneath. Instead, she drives at the deeper whys of books. Because we need them, because they’re there for us, because they endure. Because your friend will make you read one and it will feel like your souls are sharing a small room together, happily. Just because.
Books. Why? Because.

Books. Why? Because.

bookavore:

When Jenn tells me a book is possibly her “favorite book of all time. seriously. FAVORITE,” I read it, quick. It took me 48 hours from her declaration to acquire and read Books & Islands in Ojibwe Country by Louise Erdrich, and of course Jenn is largely right. I love Erdrich, and this book is fantastic. For fans of Erdrich, it offers an insight that’s not found in her other books (think the personal nature of Shadow Tag, but without the darkness and pain of that book). For those who haven’t read her yet, it’s a fantastic extended essay, and an American memoir of real substance.

What I loved best about it is the overarching question, which Jenn also notes: “Books. Why?” She offers a number of specific answers throughout the book:

  • "Because our brains hurt."
  • "I can take home along anywhere in the person of a book, and I do."
  • "Because they are wealth, sobriety, and hope."

Meandering off to explore the geography and history of Ojibwe Country, her family, the language of Ojibwemowin, the resurgence of traditional belief, her internal life—Erdrich always returns to this idea. Books. Why? This loose focus is meditative, calming, and radical. So much of the subtext of our conversations about books these days contains this same question, but in anger. Why does this person get to write books? Why do people read those books? Why would you like that book? Why does anybody review books? Why don’t more people read? Books. Why?

Erdrich’s book doesn’t answer these questions, deflating them, and for me, exposing the fear underneath. Instead, she drives at the deeper whys of books. Because we need them, because they’re there for us, because they endure. Because your friend will make you read one and it will feel like your souls are sharing a small room together, happily. Just because.

Books. Why? Because.

Books. Why? Because.

Monday, June 23, 2014
Rene Russo has my number.

Rene Russo has my number.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014
You’re off to a good start.

You’re off to a good start.

(Source: myarmisnotalilactree)

Thursday, February 6, 2014
Sometimes that’s where you’ll find them.

Sometimes that’s where you’ll find them.

(Source: take-a-look-read-a-book)

Saturday, January 18, 2014
swissmiss:

Yay Internet! #ilovetheinternetsomuch

SELFIE.

swissmiss:

Yay Internet! #ilovetheinternetsomuch

SELFIE.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013
If a painting really works down in your heart and changes the way you see, and think, and feel, you don’t think, ‘oh, I love this picture because it’s universal,’ ‘I love this painting because it speaks to all mankind.’ That’s not the reason anyone loves a piece of art. It’s a secret whisper from an alleyway. Psst, you. Hey kid. Yes you.

This, from The Goldfinch, about art, is how I feel about books. (via irisblasi)

In my head books are wearing trench coats, barely visible in the shadows of the alleyways I tend to run away from, but that doesn’t make this any less true.

Saturday, December 14, 2013
This is how my library is handling S.

This is how my library is handling S.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
So…is it legal to marry a book?

So…is it legal to marry a book?

(Source: thecolorsofmymind)

Saturday, November 2, 2013
We have the idea in America that a book should have likeable characters and make us feel good by the end. This is a new and idiotic idea and erases 2,500 years of literary culture. Tragedy is about exposing our badness, laying it bare.

David Vann (via mttbll)

Which David does oh so well.