Thursday, July 10, 2014

BAD FEMINIST TOUR DATES

roxanegay:

August 6, Lansing, MI, Schuler Books, 7 pm

August 7, Ann Arbor, MI, Literati Bookstore, 7 pm

August 8, Milwaukee, Boswell Books, 7 pm

August 27, Chicago, Women & Children First, 7:30 pm

August 29, St. Louis, Left Bank Books, 7 pm

September 21, NYC, Brooklyn Book Festival, TBA

September 21, NYC, Book Court, 7pm

September 22, NYC, TBA

September 23, NYC, Harper Perennial 50th Anniversary, Housing Works, 7pm

September 24, Berkeley, CA, Mrs. Dalloway’s (w/ Ayelet Waldman), 7:30 pm

September 25, San Francisco, CA, City Lights, 7 pm

You can see other places where I will visit, beyond these dates, here.

teachingliteracy:

kdhume

Meet Empress Wu.
Wednesday, July 9, 2014
smashfizzle:

I feel so blessed right now. Thank you so much, @harperperennial! #BadFeminist #RoxaneGay

Ashley received this copy.

smashfizzle:

I feel so blessed right now. Thank you so much, @harperperennial! #BadFeminist #RoxaneGay

Ashley received this copy.

I really love this book trailer for James A. Grymes’ Violins of Hope. It’s a beautiful introduction to a story that needs to be heard.

In Violins of Hope, music historian James A. Grymes tells the amazing, horrifying, and inspiring story of the violins of the Holocaust, and of Amnon Weinstein, the renowned Israeli violinmaker who has devoted the past twenty years to restoring these instruments in tribute to those who were lost, including 400 members of his own family. Juxtaposing tales of individual violins with one man’s harrowing struggle to reconcile his own family’s history and the history of his people, it is a poignant, affecting, and ultimately uplifting look at the Holocaust and its enduring impact.

apsies:

GET IN LINE.

When you ladies are done I’m going to need Tim to come over here and save publishing.

apsies:

GET IN LINE.

When you ladies are done I’m going to need Tim to come over here and save publishing.

First, gather 6-8 1-inch thick hard cover books and wipe the spines and covers clean (you could also cover them in parchment paper). Set them up vertically, spine up, so that they can be your taco shell molds.

The Library of Choco Tacos.  (via winesburgohio)

Physical books: 1, ebooks: 0.

bookavore:

When Jenn tells me a book is possibly her “favorite book of all time. seriously. FAVORITE,” I read it, quick. It took me 48 hours from her declaration to acquire and read Books & Islands in Ojibwe Country by Louise Erdrich, and of course Jenn is largely right. I love Erdrich, and this book is fantastic. For fans of Erdrich, it offers an insight that’s not found in her other books (think the personal nature of Shadow Tag, but without the darkness and pain of that book). For those who haven’t read her yet, it’s a fantastic extended essay, and an American memoir of real substance.
What I loved best about it is the overarching question, which Jenn also notes: “Books. Why?” She offers a number of specific answers throughout the book:
"Because our brains hurt."
"I can take home along anywhere in the person of a book, and I do."
"Because they are wealth, sobriety, and hope."
Meandering off to explore the geography and history of Ojibwe Country, her family, the language of Ojibwemowin, the resurgence of traditional belief, her internal life—Erdrich always returns to this idea. Books. Why? This loose focus is meditative, calming, and radical. So much of the subtext of our conversations about books these days contains this same question, but in anger. Why does this person get to write books? Why do people read those books? Why would you like that book? Why does anybody review books? Why don’t more people read? Books. Why?
Erdrich’s book doesn’t answer these questions, deflating them, and for me, exposing the fear underneath. Instead, she drives at the deeper whys of books. Because we need them, because they’re there for us, because they endure. Because your friend will make you read one and it will feel like your souls are sharing a small room together, happily. Just because.
Books. Why? Because.

Books. Why? Because.

bookavore:

When Jenn tells me a book is possibly her “favorite book of all time. seriously. FAVORITE,” I read it, quick. It took me 48 hours from her declaration to acquire and read Books & Islands in Ojibwe Country by Louise Erdrich, and of course Jenn is largely right. I love Erdrich, and this book is fantastic. For fans of Erdrich, it offers an insight that’s not found in her other books (think the personal nature of Shadow Tag, but without the darkness and pain of that book). For those who haven’t read her yet, it’s a fantastic extended essay, and an American memoir of real substance.

What I loved best about it is the overarching question, which Jenn also notes: “Books. Why?” She offers a number of specific answers throughout the book:

  • "Because our brains hurt."
  • "I can take home along anywhere in the person of a book, and I do."
  • "Because they are wealth, sobriety, and hope."

Meandering off to explore the geography and history of Ojibwe Country, her family, the language of Ojibwemowin, the resurgence of traditional belief, her internal life—Erdrich always returns to this idea. Books. Why? This loose focus is meditative, calming, and radical. So much of the subtext of our conversations about books these days contains this same question, but in anger. Why does this person get to write books? Why do people read those books? Why would you like that book? Why does anybody review books? Why don’t more people read? Books. Why?

Erdrich’s book doesn’t answer these questions, deflating them, and for me, exposing the fear underneath. Instead, she drives at the deeper whys of books. Because we need them, because they’re there for us, because they endure. Because your friend will make you read one and it will feel like your souls are sharing a small room together, happily. Just because.

Books. Why? Because.

Books. Why? Because.

laughterkey:

bookoisseur:

gaystray:

do you ever just smell an old perfume, or hear an old song, or pass an old hangout spot and kinda break inside for a couple minutes

One of the books I’m currently reading is The Perfume Collector by Kathleen Tessaro:

image

If you have never read one of her books, you should. They are gorgeous and themed and are contemporary historical fiction, and basically they make me want to have my own custom perfume created TOMORROW. All of them. Not just this one. Perfume is a theme in all of her stories.

On my list.

Tuesday, July 8, 2014
What…what is the point of this.

What…what is the point of this.

(Source: dopestuff)

Less than a month until Bad Feminist goes on sale! I received my first copy, hot off the press, and busted some ear drums yesterday. It’s an August IndieNext Pick, so it’ll start appearing in your favorite independent bookstore pretty soon.

We created some images for you, if you feel like spreading the word. I put one on twitter and it’s also sitting pretty in my sidebar.