Saturday, April 19, 2014

joshuanguyen:

Hello Saturday

Today is a good day to love.

Friday, April 18, 2014

Night Vale Episode #49 Live in NYC

happierman:

image

We’re playing The Town Hall in midtown Manhattan, y’all! We’re going to have Cecil Baldwin and Disparition and a lot (a lot!, he says again) of special guest voices (some old, some new!)

This will be a live performance of Episode 49 (our 2nd anniversary episode) and will be a one night only event. While the recording will be put out into the world, we will not perform this script live again. 

The show is at 7pm on Wed, June 4 at The Town Hall - 123 W 43rd St, NYC

Tickets go on sale to the public tomorrow (Friday, April 18 at noon). Here is that link: http://www.ticketmaster.com/event/03004C89FF13E460

See you there!

Yessssssss.

We jokingly referred to these as Avocado Editions (the California version of our Olives) but it is serious business how sick this box set is. Like, I’ve-considered-booking-a-flight-to-California sick.
California Bookstore Day, May 3rd. Find out where you can get this here.

We jokingly referred to these as Avocado Editions (the California version of our Olives) but it is serious business how sick this box set is. Like, I’ve-considered-booking-a-flight-to-California sick.

California Bookstore Day, May 3rd. Find out where you can get this here.

Thursday, April 17, 2014
harperbooks:

I went upstairs to visit our first edition of Gabriel Garcia Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude. Happy birthday, sir.

Back when I used to work at Harper I visited often. This was from a little over two years ago.
Mary told me while I was shuffling through a file cabinet on another floor. We’re moving soon, see, and all of the files crammed into cabinets lining our hallways need to be sorted, claimed, and possibly archived. I was thumbing through press clips from Charles Bukowski and John Fante’s books, newsprint that someone had cut out and pasted onto copy paper, now brittle and floating free of the dried-up adhesive. Her voice was tight.
This is an imprint, the news about his illness had hit weeks ago, we knew this was coming. But it still hurts. You can never be prepared for this kind of thing, and you’ll end up crying over all that we have left: their words, their history. I closed the drawer on Bukowski and Fante and rested my forehead on the cool metal. The world had just become a little…less.
In the flurry of the news a demand will surge. People will share their stories, how Gabo’s beautiful words touched their hearts and changed their lives. Some will scurry to find out more about this author they just heard about and others will grasp into this new void for all that they have left, adding to private collections or pressing old favorites into the hands of friends. It’s funny how we have to do business, take a moment for ourselves but then focus on getting books out the door. The world is in mourning and this is what they need.
It’ll hit us later, after we’ve finished filing and closed out of our inboxes. We’ll become overwhelmed with sadness and yearning and a little bit of hatred toward whoever/whatever did this, took him from us. But then we’ll be able to turn to his books.
We’ll be able to feel the magic again.
We’ll read.

harperbooks:

I went upstairs to visit our first edition of Gabriel Garcia Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude. Happy birthday, sir.

Back when I used to work at Harper I visited often. This was from a little over two years ago.

Mary told me while I was shuffling through a file cabinet on another floor. We’re moving soon, see, and all of the files crammed into cabinets lining our hallways need to be sorted, claimed, and possibly archived. I was thumbing through press clips from Charles Bukowski and John Fante’s books, newsprint that someone had cut out and pasted onto copy paper, now brittle and floating free of the dried-up adhesive. Her voice was tight.

This is an imprint, the news about his illness had hit weeks ago, we knew this was coming. But it still hurts. You can never be prepared for this kind of thing, and you’ll end up crying over all that we have left: their words, their history. I closed the drawer on Bukowski and Fante and rested my forehead on the cool metal. The world had just become a little…less.

In the flurry of the news a demand will surge. People will share their stories, how Gabo’s beautiful words touched their hearts and changed their lives. Some will scurry to find out more about this author they just heard about and others will grasp into this new void for all that they have left, adding to private collections or pressing old favorites into the hands of friends. It’s funny how we have to do business, take a moment for ourselves but then focus on getting books out the door. The world is in mourning and this is what they need.

It’ll hit us later, after we’ve finished filing and closed out of our inboxes. We’ll become overwhelmed with sadness and yearning and a little bit of hatred toward whoever/whatever did this, took him from us. But then we’ll be able to turn to his books.

We’ll be able to feel the magic again.

We’ll read.

Harvey Araton’s When the Garden Was Eden has been made into a documentary directed by Michael Rapaport! It premieres at the Tribeca Film Festival tonight (with some screenings on Saturday as well), but don’t worry, it’ll be broadcast on ESPN in the fall.
As an extra treat for all of you Knickerbockers fans (or haters, I see you), we’ve reduced the price of the ebook to $2.99!

Harvey Araton’s When the Garden Was Eden has been made into a documentary directed by Michael Rapaport! It premieres at the Tribeca Film Festival tonight (with some screenings on Saturday as well), but don’t worry, it’ll be broadcast on ESPN in the fall.

As an extra treat for all of you Knickerbockers fans (or haters, I see you), we’ve reduced the price of the ebook to $2.99!

todaysdocument:

In Vermont, even dogs get excited for the Bookwagon!
Happy National Bookmobile Day!

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.



I am that dog.

todaysdocument:

In Vermont, even dogs get excited for the Bookwagon!

Happy National Bookmobile Day!

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.

I am that dog.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

taherehmafi:

ransom and i got married several months ago in an intimate ceremony, but recently had a larger reception for more family and friends, and it was a blast! as we’re both writers, it seemed fitting to have the event at one of our favorite bookstores: the last bookstore in downtown LA. we’ve had a lot of requests for photos, so i thought i’d drop a few here. hope you enjoy them as much as we do! 

:::for the especially curious:::

my bouquet: was made from the pages of ransom’s novel (miss peregrine’s home for peculiar children).

our photographers: brandon + katrina of brandon wong photography.

venue: the last bookstore in downtown los angeles.

catering: the extremely fabulous heirloomla.

flowers: from floral art!

rentals: furniture from found rentals, dishes from dishwish!

the band: one of our favorite local indie bands, the gallery.

hugs and books!

xx

tahereh

OMG.

thebarnesandnoble:

Who knows which city this B&N is in?

Good morning Baltimooooore!

thebarnesandnoble:

Who knows which city this B&N is in?

Good morning Baltimooooore!

Monday, April 14, 2014

wattsay:

thelovelylifeofareader:

thebookishdragon:

booktown:

randomhouse:

seasighing:

Life tip: bring a book with you everywhere you go

Life pro tip: bring two, in case you finish the first one.

Bigger life pro tip: Bring a kobo/kindle with you everywhere so you have an entire library with you at all times. 

Ultimate life pro tip: live in a library and never ever leave. 

Supreme life tip: Become a library

Long live the new flesh.

Count the shadows.

strandbooks:

Marked passage, Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, page 76.

Luckily, we know better.

Mmhmm.